take

I

n. (colloq.)

reaction

1) a double take ('delayed reaction') (to do a double take)

illegal payments

2) on the take (they were all on the take) ('they were all accepting bribes')

II
v.

1) to take (a matter) lightly; seriously

2) (A) ('to carry') she took a cup of tea to him; or: she took him a cup of tea

3) (d; intr.) to take after ('to resemble') (he takes after his father)

4) (d; tr.) ('to construe') to take as (we took her gesture as a sign of friendship; I took his remark as a compliment)

5) (d; tr.) ('to grasp') to take by (she took him by the hand)

6) (D; tr.) ('to lead, accompany') to take for (she took her daughter for a walk; he took us for a ride)

7) (D; tr.) ('to obtain, secure') to take for (I took the book for him)

8) (d; tr.) to take for ('to assume to be') (do you take me for a fool?)

9) (D; tr.) ('to obtain'); ('to remove') to take from (he took the book from her; I took the money from the safe)

10) (d; tr.) ('to subtract') to take from (take five from ten)

11) (d; tr.) ('to carry') to take into (take the chairs into the house)

12) (d; tr.) to take into ('to bring into') (to take smb. into one's confidence; they took the prisoner into custody)

13) (d; tr.) to take into ('to include') (to take smt. into consideration; we took all the facts into account)

14) (d; tr.) ('to remove'); ('to deduct') to take off (I took the books off the shelf; they took ten pounds off the bill)

15) (d; tr.) ('to carry') to take out of (take the chairs out of the house)

16) (d; intr.) to take to ('to like') (to take kindly to an offer; she took to them at once)

17) (d; intr.) to take to ('to begin'); ('to engage in') (to take to drink; she took to gambling at the casinos; he took to fishing with great gusto)

18) (d; intr.) ('to go'); ('to have recourse') to take to (to take to one's bed; to take to the streets; to take to the lifeboats; to take to the air-waves)

19) (d; tr.) ('to lead, accompany, transport') to take to (to take smb. to dinner; she took us to the art museum; we took them to the station)

20) (d; tr.) ('to carry') to take to (I took the books to the library; she took the money to the bank)

21) (d; tr.) ('to move, transfer') to take to (they took the case to the supreme court)

22) (D; tr.) ('to accept, bear') to take with (he took his punishment with a smile; to take a remark with a grain of salt)

23) (M) ('to consider'); ('to accept') I took him to be a friend; do you take this man to be your lawful wedded husband?

24) (O) ('to require') the job took us two hours

25) (O) ('to seize') we took him prisoner; to take smb. hostage

26) (R) ('to demand, require') it sometimes takes courage to tell the truth

27) (misc.) she took it on herself to break the news; to take five (esp. AE; colloq.) ('to have a five minute break'); they took the law into their own hands ('they dispensed justice without a trial'); to take smb. to court ('to sue smb.'); to take smb. under one's wing ('to protect and help smb.'); to take to one's heels ('to flee'); to take by storm ('to overwhelm completely'); to take by surprise ('to surprise'); to take smt. lying down ('to accept a defeat without protest'); to take smt. for granted (see granted)

* * *
[teɪk]
('to accept') I took him to be a friend
do you take this man to be your lawful wedded husband?
or: she took him a cup of tea
seriously
to take smb. hostage
they took the law into their own hands ('they dispensed justice without a trial')
to take smt. lying down ('to accept a defeat without protest')
to take to one's heels ('to flee')
to take five ('to have a five minute break'; esp. AE; colloq.)
to take by storm ('to overwhelm completely')
to take smb. under one's wing ('to protect and help smb. ')
to take smb. to court ('to sue smb. ')
to take by surprise ('to surprise')
('to deduct') to take off (I took the books off the shelf; they took ten pounds off the bill)
('to remove') to take from (he took the book from her; I took the money from the safe)
to take smt. for granted (see granted)
('to have recourse') to take to (to take to one's bed; to take to the streets; to take to the lifeboats; to take to the airwaves)
(0) ('to require') the job took us two hours
(0) ('to seize') we took him prisoner
(A) ('to carry') she took a cup of tea to him
(R) ('to demand, require') it sometimes takes courage to tell the truth
(misc.) she took it on herself to break the news
to take (a matter) lightly
['illegal payments'] on the take ('they were all accepting bribes'; they were all on the take)
(d; intr.) to take to ('to begin')
(D; tr.) ('to obtain, secure') to take for (I took the book for him)
(d; tr.) ('to carry') to take to (I took the books to the library; she took the money to the bank)
(d; tr.) to take for (do you take me for a fool?; 'to assume to be')
(D; tr.) ('to accept, bear') to take with (he took his punishment with a smile; to take a remark with a grain of salt)
(d; intr.) to take after (he takes after his father; 'to resemble')
(D; tr.) ('to lead, accompany') to take for (she took her daughter for a walk; he took us for a ride)
(d; tr.) ('to grasp') to take by (she took him by the hand)
(d; tr.) ('to move, transfer') to take to (they took the case to the supreme court)
(colloq.) ['reaction'] a double take (to do a double take; 'delayed reaction')
(d; intr.) to take to (to take kindly to an offer; she took to them at once; 'to like')
(d; tr.) to take into (to take smb. into one's confidence; they took the prisoner into custody; 'to bring into')
(d; tr.) ('to lead, accompany, transport') to take to (to take smb. to dinner; she took us to the art museum; we took them to the station)
(d; tr.) to take into (to take smt. into consideration; we took all the facts into account; 'to include')
(d; tr.) ('to construe') to take as (we took her gesture as a sign of friendship; I took his remark as a compliment)
(d; tr.) ('to subtract') to take from (take five from ten)
(d; tr.) ('to cany') to take into (take the chairs into the house)
(d; tr.) ('to carry') to take out of (take the chairs out of the house)

Combinatory dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms: